Electromagnetic Compliance: Pre-Compliance Test Basics

INTRODUCTION:

Today’s products are subjected to more standardized test requirements than ever before. These standards (UL, CE, and others) ensure consumer safety and add to the quality and dependability of products. But, these tests also add cost to the manufacturer, which is passed to the consumer. This is especially true with electronics.

Any product that has the ability to generate radio frequency (RF) signals and is slated for commercial use is subject to meeting certain limits on the amplitude of radio frequency (RF) signals that it can produced. Unintended RF is typically referred to as electromagnetic interference (EMI) and measuring a products performance with respect to these limits is known as electromagnetic compliance (EMC) testing.

These tests are mandated and enforced by government agencies (the Federal Communications Commission in the USA) that oversee the geography into which a product will be sold. They are also responsible for defining the test configuration (physical location, layout, distances, test equipment, and settings) as well as specifying the minimum performance of the product type.

The primary goal for setting these limits is to ensure that products don’t interfere with the normal operation of existing products and broadcast channels (radio and TV, for example). Products that don’t meet these standards are not available for legal sale within the country and companies may have to halt sales, recall product, and/or pay fines if products are found to be non-compliant.

EMC testing can be self-certified. That is, a manufacturer can perform the testing and certify that they pass the limits set forth for their product. In practice, most companies send their products to a third-party test lab to perform the required testing. This is due, in part, to the special equipment and knowledge required to successfully perform EMC testing.

An accredited third-party lab has the expertise and equipment to quickly and accurately determine the performance of a product vs. the government limits on that product type. Full compliance testing in a lab is ideal and highly recommended when you are confident that the product meets or exceeds the limits, but testing in a lab can be expensive. Standard rates currently hover between $1000 and $2000 per day and there can be additional difficulties scheduling time to get into the lab. Additional issues arise if the product fails. Every failed compliance test requires a fix and retest. If the first fix doesn’t work, another fix is applied, and the product is retested. This process continues until the product passes the testing requirements.

Fortunately, there are test methods and techniques that can help minimize the amount of lab time that may be required to pass compliance testing. These pre-compliance test techniques can be implemented early in the design process and applied throughout the development cycle. Testing EMI during product development instead of after will lessen the overall cost and shorten the total development time. It will also deepen your understanding of the RF footprint of your product and allow you to make adjustments before the design is finalized, saving you time and money. The knowledge gained during these troubleshooting stages can be also applied to future designs.

RADIATED EMISSIONS/NEAR FIELD:

Radiated emissions compliance testing involves measuring the RF power that emanates from a product over a specified frequency range using an antenna and a spectrum analyzer and comparing it to the standard limits for that product class.

Figure 1: A Siglent SSX3021X 2.1GHz spectrum analyzer.

Accurately measuring the radiation emitted from a product requires reduction of external RF sources like radio stations, radar, and Wi-Fi. Throughout most of the 20th century, outdoor testing sites located far from RF sources could be utilized. Over the past 20 years, the exponential increase in RF sources (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cell phones, and the like) have made these open air test sites (OATS) facilities practically extinct. Most compliance labs utilize special rooms (anechoic and semi-anechoic chambers) that minimize the amount of external RF. The device-under-test (DUT) is placed on a rotating stage atop a non-conductive table and the antenna orientation (height and rotation) can also be adjusted. This allows a complete survey of the emitted radiation from the DUT in three dimensions. A basic diagram of a common radiated emissions test is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: A common radiated emissions compliance test configuration. 

Correlating the potential compliance performance of a DUT from data captured during radiated pre-compliance tests can be a tricky process. The environmental RF, reflections, and absorption can make repeatable measurements difficult at best and most organizations don’t have the budget to build and maintain a special chamber designed for the task. Shielded tents and fixtures can be used to minimize environmental RF and periodically measuring the environmental RF can help provide a clearer picture of the radiated emissions from your product, but near-field measurements are the primary method used to identify the potential problem areas of a design because the measurements are less prone to environmental effects and they are more convenient due to the smaller size of the probes.


The near-field probing technique involves using a loop or point probe connected to a spectrum analyzer. The two most common types of near-field probes available are magnetic (H) and electric (E) field probes. They are effective because they are fairly immune to environmental RF. During a test, the probe is placed close to the DUT and is slowly used to scan across different areas. The distance from the DUT varies, but less-than-a-half-inch is a good starting point. Scans can be performed at every step of the design process, including discrete circuit elements, traces, sub-assemblies, all the way up to finished products and enclosures. The most likely problem areas include cut-outs, seams, and gaps in metal enclosures, LCD/display ribbon cables, USB/LAN ports, and switching power supply circuits. While scanning, observe the analyzer and look for increased amplitudes on the display. Note the frequency bands with the most prevalent signals. These could be problematic EMI sources. Figure 3 shows commercial near-field probes and figure 4 shows an example of using a near-field probe and spectrum analyzer to determine problem areas of a design.

Figure 3: Siglent SRF5030 Near-Field Probe kit includes 2 loop and 2 point magnetic (H) field probes, cable, and adapter. Only the probes are shown.

Figure 4: Scanning a board using a Siglent SSA 3021X Spectrum Analyzer and an SRF5030 near-field probe.

CONDUCTED EMISSIONS:



Products that receive power by wires or cords to the national power distribution grid need additional testing. In most cases, this means any product that is connected to a wall outlet, but can include industrial connections as well. This is known as conducted emissions testing which involves measuring the RF energy that originates in the product and propagates down the power cord onto the power grid. This is important because excessive RF on the power lines can cause interference with AM radio and other broadcast bands.


Conducted emissions testing requires a spectrum analyzer, two bonded metal plates that function as ground planes, and a Line-Impedance-Stabilization-Network (LISN). The LISN supplies power to the device-under-test (DUT) and diverts the RF from the DUT to the spectrum analyzer, where it can be measured. Additional transient protection and attenuation can be added to help minimize the risk of damage to the sensitive RF input of the analyzer. A typical conducted emissions setup is shown in figure 5.

Figure 5: Typical conducted emissions compliance configuration. A transient limiter and attenuator are recommended to protect the input of the analyzer.

The cost for emulating a fully compliant conducted emissions test setup is relatively low. This makes correlating pre-compliance data to expected compliance performance significantly easier than with radiated emissions.




IMMUNITY/SUSCEPTIBILITY:



In the US, compliance testing for consumer products focuses on maintaining the conducted and radiated emissions of a product. But, there is another aspect of compliance testing that we would like to cover. Products used for military and aerospace products in the US as well as many consumer products being sold in Europe and Asia will likely require immunity testing. These tests are designed to ensure that a product can operate correctly when it is in an environment that contains specific RF signals. Immunity tests can also be referred to as susceptibility testing, as the tests are determining if a product is “immune to” or “susceptible to” interference.



The basic configuration for immunity testing is shown in figure 6 below. An RF source is used to deliver specific RF power over defined frequency bands and the operation of the EUT is observed. The EUT should maintain normal operating functions throughout the test.

Figure 6: A typical immunity test. Note that an RF absorbing chamber is used to contain the RF power and minimize the leakage into the environment. 

Note that the configuration of the test is very similar to a radiated emissions test, but instead of measuring the amount of radiated RF power from the EUT with a spectrum analyzer, the EUT is actually being radiated by RF power being delivered by an antenna and RF source. The RF absorbing chamber is also being used. This is to prevent the RF from escaping into the environment and causing issues with the world “outside” of the test lab. It is critical to stay below the published standards for unlicensed intentional radiators if you perform this test. At a minimum, you could cause disturbances with Wi-Fi or other networks nearby. Worst case, you could cause issues with radar or other systems that are critical to ensure the safety of people. Please be cautious and follow the regulations for your region.




CONCLUSION:



Products with the ability to produce RF energy need to be tested to ensure that they comply with government regulations. The two most common compliance tests radiated and conducted emissions tests. While companies may choose to self-certify, it is recommended to have a third-party lab perform compliance tests. But, third party labs can be expensive and scheduling time in the lab can be difficult.


Implementing in-house pre-compliance testing of near-field and conducted emissions test techniques at each stage in the design process can minimize the total development time for your products, lower the cost of design, and decrease the amount of testing on future products.



REFERENCES:



Basic Guidelines: Federal Communications Commission (

www.fcc.gov

)

Unintentional Radiators: Title 47, Part 15, Subpart B of the Electronic Code of Regulations for the USA

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email

How to observe the ripple of the power supply by Siglent digital storage oscilloscope

Now, the technology of the power module and supply is  update  very quickly. The engineers have to face a challenge: How to select the power supply instruments more efficiently and accurately, which meets the requirements. And the measurement&test companies must offer the solution to test the ripple with the digital storage oscilloscope.

1.Measuring method

Many engineers find the ripple is hundreds of units mv tested by the digital storage oscilloscope. That is an error caused by the wrong test method dozens of times as large as the description in the specifications. We would like to introduce the correct steps of using SDS1000 as following as below:

1.1 Active the function of limiting bandwidth and set 20MHz, or open low-pass filter to adjust the max value of the bandwidth; The purpose of this setting is preventing from the high frequency noise in digital circuit to keep the accuration.

1.2 Choose AC coupling: in order to avoid DC signal is too strong to being captured by SDS1000. (using small voltage range to observe ripple)

1.3 Keep the ground cable of the probe be as short as possible. For example: remove the probe’s ground cable, and use a short ground cable to tie with the core of the probe. That will keep the length of ground cable be less 1cm. (It is very important to reduce the noises from other devices. Because the ripple signal is very weak)

1.4 Digital storage oscilloscope must be floating, except the ground junction between the probe and signal. Do not adopt other methods to connect the instrument with the ground to avoid other noise.

Comparison of measuring the ripple:

2.  Requirements

Digital storage oscilloscope

Have the function of bandwidth limitation or digital filtering, for example SDS1000 series.

Probes

There is a short metal wire in the accessories of Siglent probe. Use them together, or make a short ground line by yourself; Take off the original ground line from the probe, then make a short one with moderate CAT5 copper wire, Tin wire, or Aluminum wire.

Choose 1X(non-attenuation): reduce the jam from the high frequency noise by the passive probe with 1X in 6MHz/10MHz. Using 10X will weaken the ripple signal to raise the difficulty of the observation, let alone filter.

3.Comparison of measuring the ripple with different probes

Use normal probe to test the ripple:

Image 3.1  ripple test of Power supply output 0.18V(2mv/div sensitivity SIGLENT runs bandwidth limitation automatically)

Use the proceeded short probe to test the ripple:

Image 3.2 after the ground cable of the probe cut down

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email

Termografía en la industria aeroespacial

Termografía en la industria aeroespacial

Existen una gran variedad de aplicaciones para la Termografía. Una de estas aplicaciones son los ensayos no destructivos o NDT (Nondestructive Testing, por sus siglas en inglés).

En la industria aeroespacial se utilizan materiales compuestos que pueden estar construidos con múltiples capas de diferentes tipos materiales que se encuentran unidas. Estos materiales compuestos pueden ser utilizados por ejemplo en la fabricación de variadas piezas de aeronaves.

Con Termografía se puede realizar inspecciones de NDT ya sea en el proceso de fabricación o mantenimiento de dichas piezas de material compuesto. Algunos de los principios fundamentales de este tipo de inspecciones es analizar la transferencia de calor a través de las capas del material y los cambios en la capacitancia térmica. En ambos casos básicamente lo que se busca es detectar los posibles cambios en el patrón térmico superficial en la pieza analizada, los cuales podrían ser causados por variaciones en las capas de material y variación en la capacitancia térmica.

Algunas metodologías para realizar inspecciones de ensayos no destructivos podrían ser:

  • Pasiva, donde se utiliza el calor generado por el normal funcionamiento de los equipos.
  • Activas, donde se busca inyectar o quitar energía térmica a una pieza de material para poder analizar sus cambios en el patrón térmico superficial en función del tiempo.

Por último podría realizarse inspecciones de Pulso Activo, que tiene ciertas similitudes a las inspecciones activas, pero donde la inyección de energía puede ser realizada mucho más rápida a manera de pulsos y donde podría tomarse un gran número de imágenes térmicas en un tiempo más corto.

Se debe recordar que las cámaras termográficas no pueden ver a través de la mayoría de materiales, por lo que únicamente se estaría inspeccionando el patrón térmico superficial de los materiales, por lo que se debe tomar en cuenta la emisividad de la superficie inspeccionada.

Para realizar varias de estas inspecciones de NDT muchas veces se requiere contar con el entrenamiento de Termografía adecuado y también es necesario seguir los estándares o procedimientos de inspección. Recordemos siempre pensar térmicamente al realizar inspecciones de NDT con Termografía.

Termografía en la industria aeroespacial

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email

Los beneficios de inspeccionar “pequeños” equipos con Termografía infrarroja.

Los beneficios de utilizar Termografía infrarroja como una herramienta de “Mantenimiento Predictivo” (MPd) para aplicaciones eléctricas ya son muy conocidos. Muchos programas de MPd en industrias poseen rutas y períodos para inspeccionar sus equipos eléctricos críticos. Equipo en subestaciones, switchgear principales y centro de control de motores (MCCs) son inspeccionados con frecuencia, tanto como una vez al mes en algunas plantas. Aunque se inspeccionan todos los aparatos grandes con regularidad, muchos paneles de 208Y/120, paneles de control y otros dispositivos “pequeños” no se toman en cuenta.

Este documento explora los beneficios de incluir los equipos y sistemas eléctricos “pequeños” previamente no inspeccionados en las rutas que antes estaban ocupadas únicamente por el switchgear y los MCCs. Muchos procesos a gran escala están controlados o son monitoreados por maquinaria de interfaz humana (HMI) o por sistemas de control alimentados por 120 VAC y bajas fuentes de poder. Paneles pequeños en oficinas o cuartos de control por lo regular alimentan servidores o computadoras que controlan procesos o monitorean parámetros críticos. 

El nivel de amperaje de un dispositivo no siempre es correlativo con el grado crítico o de importancia del mismo, por lo que es tiempo que profesionales que realizan MPd empiecen a ponerle atención a los pequeños dispositivos.


El camino de la Termografía infrarroja (IR) ha sufrido varios cambios durante los últimos años y las innovaciones en las cámaras han dominado dichos cambios. Comparado con la actualidad, en el pasado realizar inspecciones termográficas era un proceso tedioso e incomodo.

Gracias a la tecnología, las cámaras de hoy son pequeñas, más económicas y han incrementado su portabilidad comparada con las que se tenía que cargar en “los viejos tiempos”. Casi todas las cámaras en el mercado actual cuentan con una memoria interna o externa, lo cual es mejor que el anterior sistema Polaroid que se tenía que cargar con la cámara y es aún mucho mejor que el antiguo sistema de grabación de video que también se debía cargar con la cámara. Estos avances tecnológicos se traducen en que podemos realizar más inspecciones en un menor tiempo, reduciendo costos. ¿Pero estamos sacando el mayor provecho de estas mejoras?. Como un proveedor de servicios, mi experiencia personal ha sido que a medida que los costos de inspección han bajado, los ahorros no se han traducido en un incremento de la frecuencia con que se realizan inspecciones. Algunas veces es al contrario, debido a la poca frecuencia con que se realizan inspecciones, los equipos “pequeños” no se revisan, dejando lugar en la lista de inspección únicamente al interruptores de maniobra y equipos grandes de distribución.


Por supuesto que los interruptores y aparamentalia de la planta son críticos, pues es el corazón del sistema de distribución de los equipos eléctricos. Es obvio que el equipo industrial requiere del voltaje de operación que estos proveen para su funcionamiento y es por ello que se inspeccionan los equipos de distribución eléctrico, pero ¿Por qué dejar fuera de la inspección los circuitos que alimentan los sistemas de control o los HMI como lo son pantallas táctiles y paneles de control?. Si por ejemplo el  de la línea de entrada de su switchgear nunca se dispara, pero su Controlador Lógico Programable (PLC, que se muestra en la figura 2) falla catastróficamente debido al sobrecalentamiento en sus líneas de distribución, ¿Qué se ha salvado?​

Asi cualquiera con conocimiento en Termografía como aplicación de inspección en dispositivos eléctricos sabe como encontrar anomalías. Altas resistencias de contactos en una conexión eléctrica causan calentamiento que se incrementa a la segunda potencia de la corriente aplicada. Por esta razón, la norma NFPA-70B (practica recomendada para el mantenimiento de equipo eléctrico) sugiere una carga mínima del 40% en un circuito al momento de realizar una inspección con IR para optimizar los resultados. Un error común es pensar que la resistencia de contacto debe incrementarse en gran manera para causar recalentamiento, lo cual no es cierto.

Además los dispositivos eléctricos están categorizados según la capacidad de flujo de corriente que pueden soportar, por ello dispositivos categorizados con baja corriente también pueden tener problemas con sobrecalentamiento que producen fallas. Observe el siguiente ejemplo en la Figura 3.

Estamos viendo lo que aparenta ser un cable de control calibre 14 AWG, el cual está categorizado para soportar corrientes entre 25 y 35 amps, dependiendo el tipo particular de cable con que se fabrica.

En la imagen que se muestra , se puede ver que el conductor presenta un comportamiento térmico anormal en el punto de conexión y no así en todo el conductor. Esto aparenta indicar que el conductor no tiene una sobrecarga y que el calentamiento es causado únicamente por la corriente que fluye a través del punto de alta resistencia. Al comparar la aparente temperatura anormal note que un dispositivo con una corriente aproximada de 30 amps está produciendo una temperatura mayor a 149°C (300°F). Algo importante a observar es que el anterior circuito de control pertenece a una caldera industrial y si llegara a fallar la caldera podría apagarse interrumpiendo los procesos de dicha planta. Otro ejemplo se muestra en la figura 4, en la parte de abajo.

Para las personas no familiarizadas, la cinta eléctrica blanca en el conductor del centro de la imagen visual, indica que éste es el cable neutral por lo que es de esperar que este conductor presente algún flujo de corriente. Si funciona correctamente, la cantidad de corriente debería ser una fracción de lo que fluye por los conductores de las otras fases.

Vea la escala de temperatura en la imagen térmica, el punto de saturación se encuentra en el forro del cable (que tiene una mayor emisividad por lo que es una medición más precisa), muestra una temperatura mayor a 93°C (200°F). El cable THHN está categorizado para 90°C (194°F) por lo que puede producirse una falla térmica potencial.

También puede comparar el color asociado con la temperatura de los cables con el que está presente en los breakers en la imagen térmica. Éste es un panel de 208 VAC y normalmente es verificado en el proceso de inspección. Puede verificar que los componentes del panel están completamente expuestos. Se puede decir que la inspección de superficie de un panel con la protección metálica colocada sobre los breakers es un buen método del proceso de pre-inspección, pero no muestra por completo lo que sucede dentro del panel. Si este panel no se hubiera abierto completamente, no se habría observado la falla hasta que la misma fuera catastrófica. Asuma por un momento que este panel alimenta un espacio de oficina en una planta de manufacturación y que dentro de esta oficina se encuentra una computadora que monitorea procesos críticos. ¿Qué pasaría si sucede una falla en este panel? Por lo anterior, asignar el grado de importancia de un dispositivo basado únicamente en su voltaje o corriente, puede llevar a que el panel en este ejemplo nunca fuera inspeccionado.

¿Qué hay acerca de niveles de voltaje? Un criterio común utilizado para determinar la importancia de un aparato eléctrico para ser inspeccionado es la categorización del voltaje con que éste funciona. Nuevamente decimos que el sobrecalentamiento anormal es producto de la corriente y no del voltaje. El nivel de voltaje no tiene relación directa con el nivel potencial de falla por sobrecalentamiento. Ver figura 5.

Figura 5

Estas imágenes pertenecen a una fuente de poder de 24 V. La escala de temperatura al lado de la imagen muestra una temperatura máxima aparente de 40.9°C (105.6°F) se observa un punto de conexión de 37° (98°F). Si este dispositivo no se hubiera categorizado como importante o critico sin tomar en cuenta otras variables, únicamente el nivel de voltaje, puede ser que no se hubiera encontrado esta falla hasta que se produjera un daño.

Los paneles de control ofrecen una excelente oportunidad para maximizar los beneficios de la Termografía como una tecnología predictiva, pero lastimosamente por lo regular no se toman en cuenta. Dentro de un típico panel de control se encuentran transformadores, bloques de fusibles, breakers y otros dispositivos pequeños dentro de grandes cubiertas. Los transformadores de control dentro de un panel de control operan exactamente como los grandes transformadores que también se inspeccionan. Sólo porque son pequeñas versiones de lo que normalmente consideramos equipos críticos, no significa que ellos se deben inspeccionar con una frecuencia menor. En la figura 6 se puede notar que aún los componentes más “pequeños”, como los que se montan en un riel DIN pueden tener suficiente I2R en sus puntos de conexión para experimentar fallas relacionadas a la temperatura.

Figura 6

Figura 7

Los breakers de 20 Amps dentro de un panel de control, tienen el mismo potencial para fallar que los de 400 amps en un panel eléctrico de distribución. ¿Los breakers de 20 amps tienen un costo menor para reemplazarlos? Por supuesto que sí, pero ¿Cuál es el impacto general en la planta debido a el proceso que realizan? ¿Podríamos esperar razonablemente que un breaker dentro de un panel de 120 VAC no experimentará el mismo grado de anormalidad de la temperatura que uno en un panel de distribución de 480 VAC? Vea la figura 7, se observa lo que aparenta ser un breaker de 20 amp en un panel de 208Y/120 VAC. Observe la temperatura aparente de la anormalidad, ¿Qué pasaría si este breaker alimenta la terminal computarizada de producción desde una oficina? ¿Ya está empezando a poner atención a las cosas “pequeñas”?

Figura 8

Switches principales de servicio son rutinariamente inspeccionados, pero ¿Qué hay acerca de los fusibles de desconexión de un panel de control? (como los que se muestran en la figura 8).

Tiempo fuera de producción es tiempo perdido, no importando cual es la causa. Debemos inspeccionar los dispositivos dentro de un panel de control.

La anormalidad que se observa en la parte izquierda de la imagen, se encontró dentro de un panel de control en una planta de textiles en Alabama. La persona que me eacompaña paso de largo este panel de control mientras ibamos a inspeccionar otro dispositivo eléctrico.

Le pregunte si íbamos a inspeccionarlo, la respuesta que recibí fue: “Solo si tenemos tiempo luego de inspeccionar las cosas importantes”. Luego de que realizamos este descubrimiento, él decidió que tomáramos tiempo para inspeccionar otros 19 paneles idénticos a éste, los cuales controlaban los procesos finales de su planta. Si este panel hubiera fallado, la mitad de los procesos finales de producción se hubieran detenido. Luego de la inspección de estos paneles se realizó otros dos descubrimientos adicionales de fallas potenciales. ¡Ahora ellos ponen atención a las cosas “pequeñas”!

Como profesionales dedicados a la fiabilidad en nuestras plantas, nuestras decisiones acerca de las rutas y frecuencias de inspección de los dispositivos es crucial para lograr un cambio. La evaluación de importancia o grado crítico de cualquier dispositivo en una ruta particular de inspección debe ser considerada por el impacto que tendría si se produjera una falla, aún cuando anteriormente se considerara sin importancia debido a la categorización de voltaje o corriente.

Por lo general es una batalla muy difícil lograr cambios, esto lo sabemos propiamente por la historia de la Termografía infrarroja, pero puede cambiarse si a usted también empiezan a importarle las cosas “pequeñas”.

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email

Lo que debemos conocer acerca de las indicaciones del “Factor Servicio” descrito en las características de un motor.

factor servicio en motores

El ‘factor de servicio’ de un motor eléctrico es probablemente uno de las especificaciones menos comprendidas en la placa del motor. Para muchos podría parecer muy simple, pues si por ejemplo se tiene un valor de 1.0 el motor puede funcionar al 100% de la carga, pero si se tiene un valor de 1.15 entonces el motor podría funcionar hasta con una carga del 115% del diseño original. ¿Simple verdad? Lo anterior es erróneo, no es tan simple.

Primero echemos un vistazo a la ‘National Electrical Manufacturers Association’ (NEMA) y lo que tiene que decir acerca del factor de servicio en el estándar: (NEMA MG-1)

Para obtener un funcionamiento óptimo y la total longevidad del motor, es importante entender el factor de servicio.

1.42 Factor de Servicio—Motores AC
El factor de servicio de un motor AC es un multiplicador que cuando es aplicado a los caballos de fuerza, indica la carga permisible de caballos de fuerza que pueden ser soportados bajo ciertas condiciones para el factor de servicio (ver 14.37).

14.37.1 General
Un motor de propósitos generales de corriente alterna o cualquier motor de corriente alternante, que tiene un factor de servicio en concordancia con 12.52 es apto para la continua operación de la carga especificada, bajo las condiciones usuales de servicio dadas en 14.2. Cuando el voltaje y la frecuencia se mantienen dentro del valor especificado en la placa del motor, el mismo podría ser sobrecargado hasta el máximo de caballos de fuerza obtenidos al multiplicar los caballos de fuerza especificados por el factor de servicio en la placa del motor.

Cuando un motor es operado a cualquier factor de servicio mayor a 1.0, puede que se tenga una eficiencia, factor de potencia y velocidad diferentes a los de la carga especificada originalmente, pero el torque de arranque y el torque máximo continuarán sin cambios.

Un motor operando continuamente a cualquier factor de servicio mayor a 1.0 podría reducir su tiempo de vida o funcionamiento, al ser comparado con un motor que opera según las especificaciones de caballos de fuerza de la placa. La vida del aislamiento interno y el rodamiento podrían reducirse debido a la carga del factor de servicio.

Por lo tanto, ahora lo relacionado al factor de servicio debería estar muy claro, ¿verdad? La respuesta puede ser que no, pues si ahondamos más en NEMA MG-1, podríamos encontrar algunas estipulaciones o condiciones para exceder el factor de servicio de 1.0:

1. Para acomodar la inexactitud al tratar de predecir la demanda de caballos de fuerza en sistemas intermitentes.

2. Para aumentar la vida del aislamiento reduciendo la temperatura del embobinado a la carga especificada.

3. Para manejar sobrecargas intermitentes u ocasionales.

4. Para temperatura ambientes ocasionales mayores a 40°C.

5. Para compensar voltajes desbalanceados o bajos voltajes de la fuente.

La referencia que NEMA hace acerca del término ‘intermitente’ puede ser otro punto de confusión. Pues, ¿Cómo definiríamos intermitente? Un buen consejo podría ser monitorear la temperatura de motores que están funcionando con sobrecarga dentro del factor de servicio. Si la temperatura del aislamiento se acerca o excede a las especificaciones a las que fue diseñada, la carga debería ser reducida.

NEMA agrega algunas precauciones al hablar acerca del factor de servicio:

1. Operar con cargas dentro del factor de servicio por extendidos períodos de tiempo podría reducir la velocidad, vida y eficiencia del motor.

2. Los motores podrían no proveer torques ‘Pull-up’ adecuados y podría cometerse errores al calcular el starter y la sobrecarga. Lo anterior podría reducir el tiempo de vida del motor.

3. No se debe confiar en la capacidad del factor de servicio para aplicar la carga de manera continua.

4. El factor de servicio se establece para la operación bajo ciertas condiciones de voltaje, frecuencia, ambiente y altura sobre el nivel del mar.

Para obtener un funcionamiento óptimo y la total longevidad del motor, es importante entender el factor de servicio.

factor servicio en motores

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email

Integridad de la señal

Integridad de la señal

¿Es consciente del impacto que tiene el "ruido" de la integridad de la señal en la red industrial?

Integridad de la señal

El "ruido" u otras perturbaciones en la señal digital de la red son algunas de las causas más importantes de las interrupciones en una red industrial. Las redes industriales se han diseñado para ser inmunes al ruido en general, pero, aun así, las desviaciones de la integridad de la señal pueden producir problemas en la red.

Las desviaciones de la señal son a menudo la consecuencia de las condiciones extremas de funcionamiento del entorno y los componentes eléctricos que se encuentran en las instalaciones industriales.

La desviación de la integridad de la señal se puede observar desde dos aspectos/perspectivas/dimensiones

      • Δ amplitud
      • Δ tiempo

Realice siempre una inspección inicial de los segmentos en la instalación. Cualquier cambio en las características de la forma de onda suele ser un indicador del origen de un problema.

Impacto del ruido en las redes industriales:

  • Las desviaciones en la integridad de la señal pueden ocasionar que el dispositivo receptor genere un código de error de estructura (errores CRC o FCS). Los fallos de señales eléctricas provocan errores de comunicación en el protocolo digital.
  • Estos errores pueden producir una retransmisión excesiva, lo que crea retrasos y demasiado tráfico de red.
  • Los errores pueden ser permanentes o temporales.

Análisis de la integridad de la señal:

  • Un analizador de red típico únicamente indica que se están produciendo errores, pero rara vez diagnostica el origen del problema que proviene de los fallos de integridad de la señal.
  • Use un osciloscopio para inspeccionar visualmente la forma de onda de la señal en busca de errores de ruido en la Δ amplitud o el Δ tiempo.
  • Emplee el modo de detección de picos y envolvente/persistencia de la forma de onda para capturar y visualizar toda la extensión de las desviaciones de la integridad de la señal.
  • Algunos osciloscopios ofrecen un modo de "patrón visual" que resalta toda la extensión de las desviaciones relativas a la amplitud y el tiempo.

Ejemplos de desviaciones de la integridad de la señal que se muestran en un osciloscopio.

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Print this page
Print
Email this to someone
email